Can you also describe what the energy was like out there pregame, compared to the first two rounds? Is it different?

BUEHRLE: Yes, you can definitely tell it's the World Series, just the way the fans were coming in, everybody was cheering. You could feel the buzz around. You could definitely tell it was more than just a first or second round. You could definitely tell it's a World Series game.

You talked a lot about having lost the flow of a certain pitch and then it came back. I'm kind of curious, especially in your particular case, what does that involve when you lose a pitch and how do you get it back? Do you release, do you feel?

BUEHRLE: A lot of times when you lose a pitch it's one of those things you go through, every pitcher goes through it. You just try to minimize the time that you don't have it. You can work in bullpen sessions to try to get it back. But just to feel how the spin comes out of your hand. It's not really you're holding the ball any different, just something to do with the ball coming out of your hand. It's not spinning like it usually is.

So you can work in bullpen sessions to try to get it back, but usually it's just a matter of time.

I know the age difference between you and Pettitte is probably only five or six years, but I was wondering when you were younger, is he a pitcher who you admired or respected in watching the game?

BUEHRLE: Well, obviously anytime you watch games in World Series games, playoffs, you always see him and Roger playing with the Yankees. So, yeah, I obviously respect a guy like that. And the success he's had in the Major Leagues.

I don't really think we're the same type of pitcher, he throws a lot harder than I do. Anytime you get a guy like that that's been in the League and had success, yeah, you do have to respect him.

What are your impressions of what they bring to the table?

BUEHRLE: The hottest hitting team in the playoffs. A lot of people say they don't have an offense, but it's a lot of momentum. If a team gets hot in the playoffs, it seems to carry them. They're a scrappy team, and they don't try to do too much, they put the ball in play. When guys get on, they hit and run, steal, distract the pitcher. They go out and do everything they can to produce a couple of runs.

I'm sure you've been asked this: Do you have any explanation why your record is so much lower at home, particularly because this is such a good hitters ballpark?

BUEHRLE: I'm not sure. Last year was totally opposite. My numbers it's just one of those years. I don't know if the wind was blowing in or it was a little cold or the balls were flying out. If I did it every year, there would be something to it. But last year was totally opposite, so I have no clue what the difference is.

Two things, what do you regard as your out pitch and does it vary from game to game and how is it you came to learn to work so quickly?

BUEHRLE: It depends if one day my changeup is working for me. I don't have a strikeout pitch, so it's pretty much whatever the next swing I put it in play. And the working part of it, I've never been told to work slow, work fast. The faster you work the better off you're going to be. I just don't see any reason to go out there and waste time. Just get out there and get the ball.

I'm just curious, could you have gone another inning in your last start?

BUEHRLE: I could have went a couple more. But I don't know, they originally said I was going to go back, and once that inning lasted so long, they had the bullpen ready. My thinking was I was going to go back out there for one more.

It's raining outside and they put out the tarp; is there any chance of you sliding today?

BUEHRLE: I better not. I better hold off for that one.