CHICAGO -- When SI.com reported on Thursday that White Sox general manager Ken Williams may be in line for a possible multi-year contract extension it didn't come as any surprise to those who knew about the strong bond forged between Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf and his GM.

Actually, the only surprise is that Williams makes so little public about the terms of his contract that the expiration date really isn't officially known. There also never really was a doubt that Williams would be back in charge for the 2009 season and beyond, with Reinsdorf, Williams and manager Ozzie Guillen holding a cohesive working relationship featured by most winning teams.

All of the talk centering on Williams, though, was described by the man himself as much ado about nothing.

"That's so low on my list of priorities right now, I don't know," said Williams, concerning talks of a possible contract extension. "Whatever the last thing is on my list of priorities, that's underneath.

"I really don't know how to have that conversation with Jerry right now. Are you kidding? Whatever is last on the list, that's under it."

Reinsdorf stands as a fiercely loyal owner to the workers under his leadership with both the White Sox and Bulls organizations. Williams has earned that loyalty and a healthy dose of respect in leading the White Sox to the 2005 World Series title and then putting together a team capable of contending for the American League Central title in '08 after a dismal '07 campaign.

Although Williams said contractual matters eventually have to be finalized and put in writing, he basically is operating under a continued handshake agreement with Reinsdorf to stay on as long as they mutually agree. News of Williams coming back for multiple years is somewhat akin to talk of Guillen staying on through 2012.

For now, Williams has bigger concerns than his contract to handle, with a playoff spot firmly within his team's grasp.

"You take everything one year at a time," Williams said. "I'll deal with all of those issues at the end of the season.

"At the end of the day, if [Reinsdorf] doesn't feel like I'm doing the job and he wants me out, or I feel like, 'That's it, I've had enough,' I'll head to the exits. And you guys will see a smile on my face you haven't seen in a long time, either way."