PITTSBURGH -- The White Sox promoted Dayan Viciedo from Triple-A Charlotte on Friday before their game against the Nationals. Jayson Nix was designated for assignment on Thursday.

In 61 games in Charlotte this season, Viciedo hit .288 with 13 home runs and 31 RBIs. The 21-year-old from Cuba signed with the White Sox in 2008. Viciedo is expected to play third base for the White Sox, though manager Ozzie Guillen said he will not be in the lineup Friday.

Nix hit just .162 in 24 games with the White Sox and is hoping he can end up in the Majors with another team.

"Anytime I got the numbers I got and [I'm] playing the way I am, it's possible," Nix said of the move.

Guillen spoke to Nix after Thursday's 5-4 victory in Pittsburgh.

"This is the one thing I hate about this job, when you have a great guy, very good with the ballclub, very, very coachable man, very professional, and you have to do this," Guillen said.

Floyd back in spotlight against Strasburg

PITTSBURGH -- Gavin Floyd isn't fazed by facing Stephen Strasburg, at least not after Sunday night's close call with history at Wrigley Field.

Floyd and Cubs starter Ted Lilly each pitched no-hitters through the sixth inning in the nationally televised contest, with Lilly's no-no lasting until the ninth. So when all eyes and cameras are in Nationals Park with Floyd on the mound Friday, he'll understand the feeling.

"It's just like Wrigley," Floyd said. "An exciting game, good atmosphere and just have fun."

Jake Peavy's right arm soreness shuffled the White Sox rotation after he could not start Thursday against the Pirates, leaving Floyd in the seemingly unenviable position of facing Strasburg, the rookie phenom who has drawn attention with every pitch he's thrown. More often than not, those pitches have been impressive, too, as Strasburg has struck out 22 batters in 11 2/3 innings in his first two starts, both of which were victories.

Manager Ozzie Guillen said the White Sox will stick to the same game plan against Strasburg, though he is as excited as the rest of the Majors with what he's seen from the right-hander.

"It's all been nice," Guillen said. "I think this kid is unique. I think this is something very special. [Are we] excited to face him? No. But I think he's a good pitcher.

"But the excitement back in Washington is great. I think baseball is very excited about this kid to go out and get it done. So are we. We're looking forward to seeing him, looking forward to going to the new park and looking forward to continue playing the way we're playing now."

Floyd, meanwhile, will be focused on the task at hand.

"It's the last thing you need to worry about, is the opposing pitcher," Floyd said. "You're facing their lineup, not the opposing pitcher."

Quentin coming out of rut

PITTSBURGH -- Carlos Quentin's two-hit, two-RBI night Wednesday may have been the perfect medicine for his struggles.

Quentin, who has had issues with consistency all season long, hit a leadoff double off Pirates starter Ross Ohlendorf in the second inning Thursday. He came around to score the first run of the game on a sacrifice fly by Gordon Beckham.

Quentin had been mired in a 1-for-14 slump before Wednesday's game. He entered Thursday with a .207 batting average and no hitting streaks greater than three games.

Quentin had 35 RBIs despite just 42 hits after Thursday's double.

Manager Ozzie Guillen had said Quentin had been "going crazy" about his at-bats before Wednesday's game and that he needed the kind of performance he put forth.

"Take it one day at a time, one at-bat at a time and take it from there," Guillen said of Quentin. "You're not going to hit .700 in one at-bat. Just think about good at-bats every at-bat. That's the only way you can get out of it."

Guillen finds jewel in Clemente Museum

PITTSBURGH -- Ozzie Guillen thought he knew a lot about Roberto Clemente before Thursday.

"I know today that I don't think anything about him anymore," the White Sox manager quipped.

Guillen and bench coach Joey Cora visited the Roberto Clemente Museum on Thursday before their game against the Pirates, the finale of a three-game series, and the excitement in his voice afterward was palpable.

"I don't know why baseball people, they don't appreciate the people in the past," Guillen said. "I said that when we went to the [Negro Leagues Baseball Museum] in Kansas City. I came to this little museum of Clemente, that's something unique. That's something you have to see."

"I think people who are in Pittsburgh who are coming into town, they should go and visit that museum because that's something very, very, very [special]," Gullen added. "It's not just about Roberto Clemente, it's about Pittsburgh baseball and Pittsburgh and this is about baseball in general, because if you're not a Roberto Clemente fan you might not want to go there. But it's more than that. It's a lot of history, a lot of unique little things."