ARLINGTON -- The secret of White Sox right fielder Carlos Quentin's recent success with the bat will remain on a need-to-know basis.

And with no offense intended toward the White Sox fan base or the media covering the team, those who need to know basically include Quentin's teammates and hitting coach Greg Walker.

"Yeah, I'd rather just keep stuff to myself," said Quentin, sitting in front of his locker on Friday at Rangers Ballpark. "Through the success and, even more importantly, through the times when there is not much success, I find it easier for me to handle doing it that way."

Quentin's average dropped down as low as .201 on June 13, when he flied out to center with the bases loaded and two outs in the ninth to end the Cubs' 1-0 victory at Wrigley Field. Thanks to a .348 clip over his last 14 games, Quentin raised his average to .225 after Friday's 5-3 victory during the series opener with Texas. The White Sox right fielder also knocked out four doubles and five home runs and drove home 16 during this stretch.

Even Walker, who can break down hitters' pluses and minuses as well as anyone in the game, won't delve deeply into the turnaround for Quentin, respecting the young player's privacy where his game is concerned. Walker will divulge how a change in Quentin's routine has moved him closer to being the force he was in 2008, when the 27-year-old emerged as an American League Most Valuable Player candidate in his first year with the White Sox.

"Carlos has known all along what the problem was. That's the easy part," Walker said. "He kept battling and searching until he found a feel. He just couldn't find anything to give him a consistent feel at the plate.

"He came up with a couple of drills he's doing. I think him coming up with a new routine helped him more than anything. He didn't give into it mentally, kept fighting the fight. I'm happy for him and happy for us.

"That's usually the way it works. The person that is actually doing the swinging usually figures it out," Walker said. "You can see how good he is and how dynamic offensively Carlos is when he does start swinging."

This resurgence for Quentin ends a run of inconsistency, whether due to injury or flat-out struggles, since September 2008, by Walker's estimation.

"I tip my cap to him," Walker said. "He can hit for average and he can hit good pitching, dominant pitching. It's a big thing. You just try to be patient, pat him on the back and let him do his work. He's really latched on to something and grabbed hold of it."

Jenks returns from bereavement list

ARLINGTON -- White Sox closer Bobby Jenks was reinstated from the Major League bereavement/family medical emergency list prior to Friday's series opener in Texas, a locale where Jenks has been since June 27 to deal with a family illness.

Jenks gave an all-clear sign to pitch on Friday, despite being away from the game for one week. The burly right-hander has converted 12 consecutive save opportunities and has allowed one run in 12 innings over his previous 13 appearances, but he has not pitched since saving all three games of the Atlanta series from June 22-24.

"It's just like riding a bike," Jenks said. "You just go out there right now and get a little touch and feel in. Obviously, everything is fine. Just see about getting the blood flowing again, just go through the motions, just throw a bullpen and get back into it."

Heavy rain on Friday prevented Jenks from throwing a full side session, according to Ozzie Guillen. The White Sox manager was hoping to give Jenks another day, relying on Matt Thornton and J.J. Putz to close out a 5-3 victory.

"You know, I don't want to take the risk because we couldn't be on the field today," Guillen said prior to Friday's game. "I'm going to try to stay away from him and go with the plan we have in Kansas City and take it from there.

"Bobby didn't do anything for almost a week. It's a lot of risk for him there with all the problems he had in the past, his calf. I don't care what he does, he's not in baseball shape right now. We are going to give him one day to see how he throw on the side."

Vizquel likely to remain in mix at third

ARLINGTON -- When Omar Vizquel signed with the White Sox prior to the 2010 campaign, the idea was to use the 43-year-old to give periodic rests to second baseman Gordon Beckham and shortstop Alexei Ramirez.

"Now I have to give him a day off," said White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen of Vizquel with a laugh. "He's supposed to come here to give people a day off."

Vizquel has made 30 starts this season, with six coming at second, four at shortstop and one at designated hitter. But the 19 starts Vizquel has made at third base, primarily since Mark Teahen went on the disabled list with a fracture to the tip of his right middle finger, have held the greatest impact.

Vizquel's winning impact actually is great enough where Guillen once again wouldn't guarantee a healthy Teahen will have a starting job at third when he returns after the All-Star break. The White Sox feature a 12-8 record during games with Vizquel at third.

"If we are playing good, I have to play the same guys," Guillen said. "I don't say [Teahen] lose his job, but my job is to put guys there to win.

"I'm not saying we don't win with him but the team wasn't playing good at that particular time. He has to be patient and we are going to get a spot for him to play. My decision is to make the lineup, and the only thing I can do is put the best guys out there without screwing someone up."

Third to first

Chris Sale, the White Sox top selection in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft, made his professional debut on Friday for Class A Winston-Salem. The lanky southpaw walked one in a scoreless inning, retiring the side against Potomac on two grounders and one pop up in the eighth. ... J.J. Putz has thrown 19 consecutive scoreless innings, the longest active streak in Major League Baseball, and made 18 scoreless appearances in a row. ... The White Sox have won 13 of their previous 17 games and 17 of their last 21. ... FOX has picked up the White Sox game at Oakland on July 24, with the game time moving to 3:10 p.m. CT.