CHICAGO -- When Omar Vizquel ends his Hall of Fame-caliber Major League Baseball career, the Gold Glove shortstop has talked about possibly pursuing the managerial profession.

Vizquel's comments made on Tuesday concerning the 2010 White Sox fell more into the general manager category.


The veteran answered affirmatively and honestly when asked if he thought the White Sox needed another piece brought in to enhance their present championship chances.

"I think we need to add something," Vizquel said. "If it's not another pitcher, probably it's another hitter. This is a time where we really need to make a step towards getting better and to separate between the teams that are around, having a chance, and the teams that really need to go on to the playoffs.

"I guess the final cut is coming. This is the last time to make a change, and I think that with another guy on the team, we might secure the next step."

As the White Sox proved through their waiver-wire addition of Alex Rios last August, Saturday's 3 p.m. CT non-waiver Trade Deadline is not the last time to improve Chicago's overall look. Currently, the White Sox are in pursuit of a left-handed run producer such as Adam Dunn or Prince Fielder, or a starting pitcher to better the rotation on the heels of Jake Peavy's season-ending injury.

Dunn appears to be the White Sox priority, with ESPNChicago reporting on Tuesday how the Nationals want right-handed hurler Daniel Hudson and one player from the prospect trio of Tyler Flowers, Jordan Danks and Brent Morel. But the White Sox are known for pulling off a misdirection surprise move at the Deadline, as they did with Peavy at the end of last July.

Much like the 2005 World Series champions, the 2010 version will go as far as its starting pitching allows. But as White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen mentioned in his pregame media session Tuesday, there won't be any bargains in regard to quality hurlers.

Guillen asked for a name to be offered up as a suggestion for acquisition who could help the White Sox. Both Roy Oswalt and Fausto Carmona were thrown out, and Guillen chose to use the Cleveland sinkerballer in Carmona as an example.

"Carmona? Do you think we are going to have Oney Guillen traded for Carmona?" Guillen said. "OK, we want this guy or that guy, but what are we going to give up for those guys? That's my question. We need this guy and want this guy, but do you think Cleveland is willing to trade Carmona to the White Sox in the same division?"

White Sox starting pitching became a renewed concern this past weekend, when both Freddy Garcia and Daniel Hudson were hit hard by Oakland in defeat. But Guillen believes in his starting staff.

Hudson could become a deal-breaker in any trade the White Sox make, with young pitching a commodity in pretty much any market. Guillen believes even the best of playoff teams don't have a truly solid fifth starter, hinting how the team could survive with Carlos Torres or another fifth starter during the season's final two months if Hudson was moved.

There's also no doubt Guillen has grown tired of the constant trade talk. When he was done with Tuesday's media meeting, he sarcastically yelled toward White Sox general manager Ken Williams, seated in the stands next to the Chicago dugout, to make a trade already so people would stop asking him.

In regard to Vizquel's assessment, Guillen has no problem with freedom of speech on his team.

"Good for him. His job is to play, not to make trades," Guillen said of Vizquel. "I know how the players feel. I always give my players the freedom to talk and say how they feel. I think if they feel that way, we know that.

"Kenny is aware of that. If I had a magic ball and it said, 'If you trade for this guy, you're in,' I would trade all 25. But that's not guaranteed. Are we going to make the team better? We don't know. Believe me, I can't wait and Kenny can't wait for Sunday, just to get away from that. I think if everybody out there does what they're supposed to do, I don't think we need anything."

One addition could separate the White Sox from a tight three-team American League Central race, by Vizquel's line of logic.

"This division has the tendency to create a little problem at the end, because the Twins are not going to give up," Vizquel said. "Neither is Detroit. With all the injuries that they've had, they still have a pretty good team.

"It's going to be interesting. That's what I'm saying -- making that little change and adding one more piece to the puzzle might make the difference."