PHOENIX -- Ozzie Guillen spent Sunday morning in the hospital after passing a kidney stone.

He arrived early at Chase Field but was sent to the hospital by White Sox head athletic trainer Herm Schneider. Guillen returned to the ballpark at approximately 11 a.m. MST, but did not meet with the media before the game. He still managed the series finale against the D-backs.

Guillen had kidney-stone issues back in August of 2004, during his first year as White Sox manager. Those particular problems occurred as he was serving a two-game suspension for arguing a stolen-base call during an Aug. 9 contest against Cleveland.

"The good thing about it is it came out right away," said Guillen of passing the stone, crediting his wife, Ibis, and Schneider for their help in the matter. "I don't have to stay here and leave tomorrow and miss the game. I don't want to miss the game. Early in the game, I was kind of dizzy and kind of didn't feel too good. I feel better now.

"People say that's as close as [men] have to having a child. I went through it before. Today was worse than the first time. It's like you go to the dentist for the second time, you know what's going to happen. It was painful."

White Sox enjoy atmosphere of Cubs series

PHOENIX -- The Cubs and White Sox were pointed in different directions as far as the outlook for the 2011 regular season was concerned before the first pitch of Spring Training was even thrown.

Ozzie Guillen's crew was considered a favorite in the American League Central after going "all in" during the offseason. The Cubs were viewed more as a team on the fringe of contention, and only then if everything fell into place along the course of a 162-game run.

At least, that's how the two teams were portrayed in the media. And this Cubs-White Sox on-field rivalry, which began with three Interleague games in 1997 and continues with three games at U.S. Cellular Field starting Monday, is almost as much about the intra-city hype as it is about the competition.

"It depends on how much the media builds it up," said White Sox pitcher Mark Buehrle, who is set to start Tuesday against the Cubs. "Like I've always said, you try to say it's not a big deal.

"But once you get out there in the atmosphere, it's kind of hard not to get up on your side and try to support the fans. Everybody at work, Cubs, Sox fans, they have all these bets. You want to try to win for your fans."

Although there's a bit of a frenzied, sideshow atmosphere sometimes associated with these contests, White Sox players have described Cubs games as the closest to playoff baseball without being in the playoffs. The White Sox are hoping to use these Interleague games to build momentum for a continued climb back into contention in the AL Central.

They also are cognizant of not overlooking the Cubs, despite the North Siders sitting well below .500.

"Seeing stuff and reading stuff about how the Cubs have been playing, it seems like a lot of people are giving up on them already," Buehrle said. "But it's early in the season. We are going out to try to win the series and they are trying to do the same thing against us."

"I do know this," said White Sox general manager Ken Williams of the Cubs in a recent interview. "They have very good people over there and they need to get healthy in order for people to evaluate them, and they have a man running the club [general manager Jim Hendry] that is of the same mindset I am. He just wants to bring a championship to Chicago. Cubs fans should take some solace in that."

Danks OK day after being hit with liner

PHOENIX -- The knot on the left side of the back of John Danks' head has subsided, and the left-hander reported no trouble sleeping after taking a Stephen Drew line drive squarely off his head during the fourth inning of Saturday's 6-2 victory. Danks' humor also remained firmly intact in the face of this scary moment.

"Yeah, everything was great," said Danks of a CT scan taken Saturday night as a precautionary measure for his contusion. "I told them you can't hurt nothing."

After the ball made contact with Danks, it flew in the air and almost reached the D-backs' dugout. It rolled into the camera well for a ground-rule double.

"That was crazy. I knew it probably went up," Danks said. "I was looking for it. I had no idea where the ball was. Fortunately, everything is all right."

Follow-up tests were to be done on Danks on Sunday, but the left-hander feels ready to try and extend his winning streak to four straight in his next start against Washington this weekend. This comebacker moment was not a first for Danks, who was hit in the head by a line drive while pitching for Double-A Frisco when he was with the Rangers. That shot just didn't get him as flush.

"I got hit in the head and the third baseman caught it for the out," said a smiling Danks. "It actually caught the bill of my hat and a little bit of the temple."

Buehrle former Minors teammate of Hyde

PHOENIX -- Edwin Rodriguez, who resigned Sunday as Marlins manager, is a friend of Ozzie Guillen and his family, with the two playing together in the Minors. But Brandon Hyde, Florida's bench coach who was named interim manager, played in the White Sox system from 1997-2000. In fact, Mark Buehrle and Hyde were teammates on the '99 Class A Burlington team.

Ozzie Guillen was the third-base coach on the Marlins' 2003 World Series championship team and is sure to be mentioned among the list of candidates for this managerial opening. But Guillen is under contract with the White Sox through the 2012 season, with his option having been picked up at SoxFest.

"I didn't know he stepped down," said Buehrle of Rodriguez. "But I don't know if [Guillen] is going anywhere."

"Right now, I don't pay attention to that," said Guillen, who planned to talk with Rodriguez later. "I just read that my friend [resigned]. I have a contract here and I have to go through my contract."

Third to first

• Boxing legend Muhammad Ali watched Sunday's game with his wife and White Sox general manager Ken Williams.

• Paul Konerko ranks sixth in the Majors with 19 home runs.