Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier 66 years ago

TORONTO -- Major League Baseball celebrated Jackie Robinson Day on Monday.

As part of the tradition of honoring Robinson, who broke the color barrier in 1947, every player in baseball wore his No. 42 for the 66th anniversary of the historic milestone.

"Doing it throughout baseball makes sense, as far as baseball, and the significance of how everything has changed," White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. "Not only sports, but society and his impact on it.

"I think it's only right for us to do something to honor him, and I think it's good that we do it every year."

Robinson, whose No. 42 was officially retired from baseball in 1997, under the direction of Commissioner Bud Selig, enjoyed a successful 10-year career in the Majors with the Brooklyn Dodgers and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1962.

The movie "42" -- a biopic film on Robinson -- was released over the weekend and landed the No. 1 spot at the box office across the United States.

Greene debuts in Toronto at second base

TORONTO -- Tyler Greene, whose contract was purchased from Triple-A Charlotte by the White Sox on Sunday, made his debut with Chicago on Monday at Rogers Centre for the start of a four-game set with the Blue Jays.

Greene got the start at second base -- a position he has played more than any other but shortstop at the Major League level -- and was slotted into the No. 9 spot in the batting order. He collected singles in his first two at-bats but was picked off first by Mark Buehrle in the second inning and finished 2-for-3 in the 4-3 White Sox loss.

An opportunity was created for Greene with the big club once the White Sox placed Angel Sanchez on the 15-day disabled list, retroactive to Wednesday, with a lower back strain.

"With Angel going down, we needed a middle infielder," White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. "[Greene] can play middle infield, run a little bit. It's one of those, you just see what he has. In an emergency, he can play the outfield.

"There is no better way than to get him out there and see what he can do."

The 29-year-old Greene had spent his entire four-year career in the National League with the Cardinals and Astros before signing a Minor League deal with the White Sox at the beginning of this month.

Greene, selected in the first round of the 2005 First-Year Player Draft by the Cardinals, set career highs in 2012 with 116 games played, 11 homers, 30 RBIs, 12 stolen bases and a .674 OPS while splitting time between St. Louis and Houston.

Ventura, Flowers respect Buehrle's accomplishments

CWS@TOR: Buehrle limits former team to two runs

TORONTO -- Left-hander Mark Buehrle, who enjoyed the first 12 years of his career with the White Sox before spending the 2012 season with the Marlins, faced Chicago for the first time in his career on Monday.

The 34-year-old broke into the Majors with the White Sox in 2001 and ranks fourth in club history with 365 starts and 1,346 strikeouts, while placing sixth with 161 wins.

Buehrle, a four-time All-Star with the White Sox, threw a no-hitter in 2007 and perfect game in 2009.

Manager Robin Ventura wasn't the skipper during Buehrle's tenure, but he has the ultimate respect for what Buehrle accomplished and his standing in White Sox history.

"I understand his place in our organization, the history of our uniform. It will probably be harder for Paul [Konerko] than anybody else," Ventura said before Buehrle tossed 6 1/3 innings to pick up his first victory during Toronto's 4-3 victory.

"He's going to look weird in another uniform."

Catcher Tyler Flowers, who has been a member of the White Sox since 2009, agreed with Ventura and added how much a text message he received from Buehrle in the offseason meant to him.

Flowers won the starting catcher's job once A.J. Pierzynski left for Texas in the offseason and Buehrle reached out to congratulate him. The 27-year-old Flowers said it was an honor to receive a message from a player as respected as Buehrle.

"That's just the kind of guy he is, he's a caring guy," Flowers said. "I thought it was pretty neat that a veteran and an established guy like himself would actually take the time and send a message to me.

"He has always been up there in my book, always a nice guy. He looked out for the younger guys, so to speak. He's a quality guy."

Despite having a fastball that sits below league-average speed, Buehrle has enjoyed a very successful career. Buehrle has thrown at least 200 innings and recorded double-digit wins in every season since 2001.

Flowers said his ability to throw offspeed pitches in any count is one of the things that has allowed Buehrle to flourish.

"He's extremely competitive and fearless when he's on the mound and I think that makes him a couple notches better than what his stuff really is," Flowers said.

"He doesn't have fear to throw any pitch at any time."